Apollo 11 en de zakrekenmachine


Computer reconstruction of Neil Armstrong’s view out the Lunar Module on Apollo 11, 520 feet above the lunar surface just as he transferred from automatic control to semi-manual “attitude hold” (note his hand reaching for the switch), to fly the vehicle past West crater (visible out the window) to a smooth area for landing. Note the landing point designator, the graded angles on the window that would guide Armstrong’s eye to the computers estimate of a landing spot, and the 1202 program alarm indications on the guidance computer display at lower right. (Image: http://web.mit.edu/digitalapollo/aboutcover.html)
Computer reconstruction of Neil Armstrong’s view out the Lunar Module on Apollo 11, 520 feet above the lunar surface just as he transferred from automatic control to semi-manual “attitude hold” (note his hand reaching for the switch), to fly the vehicle past West crater (visible out the window) to a smooth area for landing. Note the landing point designator, the graded angles on the window that would guide Armstrong’s eye to the computers estimate of a landing spot, and the 1202 program alarm indications on the guidance computer display at lower right. (Image: http://web.mit.edu/ digitalapollo/ aboutcover.html)

De computer aan boord van de Apollo 11, die drie mensen naar de maan bracht, had minder rekenkracht in huis dan de gemiddelde zakrekenmachine. Dat wil het cliché: dat een smartphone tegenwoordig meer rekenkracht heeft dan alle Apollo’s bij elkaar.

AG_20080925_apollo_dig [pdf]

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